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Caldy Hills
Caldy Hill is an area of lowland heath and mixed deciduous woodland, located on a sandstone outcrop
overlooking the Dee estuary. The area includes Stapledon Woods and lies to the south west side of
Column Road (A540). Newton Common lies on the north side of Column Road and is a small, mainly
oak, woodland. Grange Hill is located off Lang Lane, West Kirby and is an area of gorse and bracken
scrub.

The whole area covers 250 acres of which 13 acres are owned by the National Trust. The hill and
woodland can be reached by bus or train via West Kirby. Car parking is along Column Road or at Kings
Drive North (see map). Horse riding is allowed on Fleck Lane and Kings Drive bridleway; it is also
allowed around the periphery of Grange Hill. Cycling is permitted on the bridleways.

The hill rises to 260 ft. at its highest point where a view-finder stands. Fine views across the estuary
and towards the Isle of Man can be obtained in clear weather. The sandstone outcrop, on which the hill
is located, is part of a ridge which extends from Heswall through Thurstaston and onto the Hilbre
Islands.

Caldy Hill has a complex local history. All the land was acquired piecemeal by Hoylake District Council
over the years between 1897 and 1974. Originally the hill was split up into small sections all privately
owned by local landowners, and then given or sold with the understanding that the land was to be
made open to the public and managed as countryside
A major landmark is the
Mariners Beacon which
stands on the site of an old
windmill. The mill was a very
useful aid to maritime
navigation and when it was
destroyed by a gale in
1839, it was greatly missed.
Consequently, the Trustees
of the Liverpool Docks, with
the permission of the
landowner, Mr. Leigh,
erected the Mariners
Beacon in 1841.  

Evidence of old enclosures
can be seen on the hill in
the form of old sandstone
walls. Many of the older
houses in the area are built
from the stone taken from
the quarries at Caldy and
on Grange Hill. Some of
these houses also have the
original oak fences which
were hand built by the
carpenter of the Caldy
Manor Estate, which
previously owned much of
the land in this area.
Evidence of old enclosures can be seen on the hill in the form of old sandstone walls. Many of the older
houses in the area are built from the stone taken from the quarries at Caldy and on Grange Hill. Some of
these houses also have the original oak fences which were hand built by the carpenter of the Caldy
Manor Estate, which previously owned much of the land in this area.

The heathland is of regional significance with a variety of heathers including Ling, Cross-leaved and Bell
Heather. The Gorse and Bracken with Birch and Oak scrub provide good cover for birds and small
mammals. During the summer months insects and butterflies such as the Common Blue and Small Copper
are present. Foxes use the bracken and bramble for cover during the day.

The oak trees on the heath are host to a variety of gall wasps. These insects lay their eggs in a specific
part of the tree which responds by producing a gall, such as an Oak Apple in which the larva develops.

Stapledon Woods is a mixed plantation of Oak, Sweet Chestnut, Beech and Ash with Elm and Sycamore.
During the spring the woods contain masses of Bluebells and Daffodils. Through the summer the trees
support a variety of woodland birds such as Great Spotted and Lesser-spotted Woodpecker, Nuthatch
and Treecreeper.

Summer migrants include Spotted Flycatcher and warblers. Pied Flycatchers and Wood Warblers have
started arriving in recent summers.
Caldy Church 1952
Caldy Village
Caldy Manor Hospital
Caldy Village Post Office